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3 Great games to entertain your dog outdoors

Using a small handful of dog treats you can easily do fun outdoor activities with your dog. Also, be sure to give your dog a little extra exercise if you have more time than usual.

This article was written by a FirstVet vet

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Treat tree

Stop by a tree during your walk and place small dog treats in the bark of the tree. Ask your dog to wait while you prepare the game. Then ask your dog to search for the treats around the tree.

You can either use treats or feed one of your dog's small meals during this game

Hide and seek

Searching for a hidden toy filled with tasty treats is a good mental exercise for your dog. This activity can be done indoors, or outdoors, during a walk, or in the garden. Hide the treats in more difficult places, at different heights, or behind objects. Make it harder by expanding the search area and finding new hiding places.

Step 1. Take a treat, or fill a toy, the right size for your dog, with some goodies that you know your dog likes.

Step 2. Show your dog the treat, let them smell it. Ask the dog to “Wait” and then hide the treat in an appropriate place.

Step 3. Ask the dog to look for the treat, by saying "Find it". Help the dog while it is searching by repeatedly saying "Find it". When they find it, you can either help to open the toy, or see if they can get the treats out by themselves. Just be careful that your dog doesn’t eat the toy too!


Agility, dog parkour and heel work

Teaching your dog to learn obedience and to do tricks is fun and interactive. There are many things that we can teach our dogs to do with the right training. Some examples include, lying down, paw, high five, crawling, rolling around, jumping, skipping obstacles and lots more. Start by holding a treat in a closed hand by your leg so that your dog understands that the treat is there, but does not take it. Say "Heel” and the dog should then walk by your side; their head should be beside your leg, or just behind. The dog's head should not protrude beyond your leg. Begin by walking a few steps and rewarding your dog. When you want to make it more difficult, increase the number of steps until you give the reward. As the dog learns, you may be able to extend the walk further. Through exercise and training, your dog will gain better body control and balance, which in turn leads to better self-confidence. There are many websites to help you get started. Follow these links to learn more about puppy training, and dog parkour.


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