Pet Medication 101: Enalapril

Enalapril for dogs and cats

It’s important to understand a medication’s uses and side effects before giving it to your pet. This medication info sheet is meant to give you a good understanding of what enalapril is used for, how it works, and potential side effects in cats and dogs. Always consult a veterinarian before giving your pet any medication.

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1. Drug Name:

Enalapril

2. Brand Names:

Vasotec, Enacard

3. How Dispensed:

Prescription-only

4. Forms:

Tablets 1mg, Tablets 2.5mg, Tablets 5mg, Tablets 10mg

5. Drug Type/Class:

Enalapril is an ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) inhibitor.

6. Uses in Dogs and Cats:

Enalapril is used to treat high blood pressure, heart failure, and asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction.

7. How it Works:

ACE inhibitors work by decreasing the chemicals that tighten blood vessels, allowing blood to flow more smoothly and the heart to pump more efficiently. Enalapril will lower blood pressure and increase blood and oxygen to the heart.

8. Side Effects and/or Signs of Overdosage:

Enalapril can cause diarrhea, cough, anorexia, vomiting, dizziness, drowsiness, itching, and problems sleeping. There are reports of some dogs having allergic reactions to enalapril.

Severe side effects include kidney issues, elevated liver enzymes, and problems with blood potassium levels. Your pet’s blood pressure, kidney values, liver values, and potassium levels should be monitored while taking enalapril.

9. Drug Interactions:

Diuretics (like furosemide and spironolactone) may change the blood pressure and lower your pet’s potassium. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) drugs used in combination with enalapril can increase the risk for kidney damage.

10. Cautionary Statements:

This medication should be used with caution in pets with decreased kidney function or liver disease. It should also be avoided in pets that are pregnant or lactating.

Read more:

Pet Medication Guide: What Common Medications Can and Can't Dogs Take?

How to Give Your Dog Oral Medication

Ask a Vet: 10 Important Questions to Ask at Your Next Vet Visit

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